Auction

STOPSO IS RAISING FUNDS VIA A WINTER ONLINE AUCTION
StopSO has received no funding from the Government, and relies on grants and individual donations.  StopSO is planning an online auction starting on December 1st, and would appreciate donations of items.  So far we have a dress that the singer songwriter Joss Stone has worn, CD’s signed by Joss Stone, a hand-made rug, signed books, beauty treatments, champagne, 2 nights in the Welsh Gatehouse holiday rental www.welshgatehouse.com, etc

FINANCIAL COSTS OF SEXUAL ABUSE TO THE UK
The NSPCC estimated the actual cost to the Exchequer of child sexual abuse was almost £425 million[i] in 2012/13.  This included spending on health, the criminal justice system and children social care services.  This equates to actual costs to the tax payer of well over £1 million per day, or £48,000 per hour. This massively increases if we add in the cost of sexual offences committed against adults.

It costs £65,000 to put one person in prison[ii], if one includes police time and court costs.  If one tenth of the people who have asked StopSO for help by 31st August 2017 would have gone to jail, but due to the work with StopSO therapists have not done so, then StopSO has saved the UK tax payer over £6 million.

FUNDING REQUIRED BY STOPSO TO DEAL WITH THE CURRENT DEMAND
StopSO needs to grow, and increase the staffing levels to manage the current demand.  Based on recent growth, we anticipate 220% increase in clients contacting StopSO next year.  Bearing in mind that it costs £65,000 to send a person to prison for one year the following figures illustrate how many people StopSO needs to divert from prison each year be cost effective, and cover the organisational and administrative costs:

  • For the rest of 2017 StopSO requires £54,000 i.e. less than the cost of putting 1 person into prison
  • In 2018 StopSO requires £185,372 i.e. less than the cost of putting 3 people into prison for a year
  • In 2019 StopSO requires £252,065 i.e. less than the cost of putting 4 people into prison for a year


SUBSIDISING THOSE WHO CANNOT AFFORD TO PAY FOR THEIR OWN THERAPY

Whilst most clients coming to StopSO pay for their own therapy, approximately 20% of our clients cannot afford to pay.  StopSO applies for grant funding to be able to offer subsidies and in 2014/5 StopSO received grants of £7,524.  However, since then our fundraising applications for this have been unsuccessful, and StopSO currently lacks the funds to be able to offer any subsidy.

Juliet Grayson, Chair of StopSO says, “Frankly, that puts StopSO in a ludicrous position.  When someone rings up, saying ‘I’m on benefits.  I feel like having sex with a child, can you provide me with a therapist who can help me stay law-abiding?’  Instead of being able to say, ‘Yes, well done for reaching out and asking for help,’ we have to say, ‘Sorry, but we don’t have the funding to be able to help you.’  This is devastating for all concerned. Especially when one thinks about the likely consequences.”

“StopSO would like sufficient funds to ensure that no-one is ever turned away.   Surely, therapy should be provided free of charge to all perpetrators asking for help who cannot afford to pay for themselves, as a cost-effective way of reducing sexual offending in the UK”

“At the end of the day, StopSO is dedicated to stopping sexual offending, and working with the perpetrators is one of the most effective ways of doing this.”

IF StopSO STOPS JUST ONE CLIENT OUT OF EVERY 150 FROM GOING TO JAIL THEN WE ARE COST EFFECTIVE

Let’s imagine for a moment, that the government funded StopSO’s staffing and administrative fees and provided sufficient funds for subsidised therapy through StopSO.  If one person out of every hundred and fifty people that asked StopSO for help, receives effective therapy, does not commit a crime and stays out of the criminal justice system, StopSO is cost effective.

[i] Saied_Tessier, A. (2014) Estimating the costs of child sexual abuse in the UK.  London: NSPCC

[ii] Focus Prisoner Education. (n.d.). The Cost of Prisons. Retrieved September 11, 2017, from http://www.fpe.org.uk/the-cost-of-prisons/